Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 1 to 10 of 76

A Almohsen, Janaka Ruwanpura

Logistics Management in Construction Industry

Abstract: The construction industry is often slower to adopt new technologies than other industries. Yet the construction industry shall embrace these technologies sufficiently in order to keep up with advances in other trades. One of the most crucial elements in construction management is productivity. And the adopting of new technologies such as mobile-based application can increase construction project productivity in such areas as materials management, tool use time, and labour motivations. Most of these aspects have been thoroughly investigated in academia; however, logistics management and its contribution to construction productivity have been insufficiently investigated, especially with respect to the use of advanced technologies. In this paper, we propose to develop a new platform to utilize modern technologies in the construction industry. Hence, the main objective of this paper is to introduce mobile-based application technologies into construction industry that will improve construction productivity by enhancing logistics management practices. The use of this model will not only help increase productivity in the construction industry but also it will make this industry more competitive with other industries. In order to achieve the main the goal of the paper, different building construction sites have been selected from which to collect data using direct observation, interviews and questionnaires. In order to ensure a high quality result, all participants were selected based on their relationship to the subject being examined. By using the outcomes of the data analysis to identify a potential solution, a computerized logistical management model was developed to examine how to enhance construction productivity and to improve logistics management practices. Many positive opinions have been granted form different constriction experts. Facilitating the communications between such project participants as contactors, subcontractors and suppliers is another expected result. Also, the model would help in organizing the schedule for the use of such heavy equipment as cranes.

Keywords: logistics management, advanced mobile-based application technologies, construction materials and equipment.

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf ( bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


A Ekholm, L Häggström

BUILDING CLASSIFICATION FOR BIM – RECONSIDERING THE FRAMEWORK

Abstract: The purpose of building classification systems is to provide the sector with agreed and standardised ter¬minology and semantics, e.g. in systems for technical specification, cost calculation, and exchange of information. There is a growing need to use classification systems in a BIM context. In inter¬¬national construction projects and international construction product trade there is a need both to translate between national classification systems and to develop common systems. The idea behind the inter¬¬national framework standard for building classification ISO 12006-2 is that national systems would be easier to compare if they adhere to the class definitions suggested in the standard. A study of two classification systems, the BSAB system in Sweden and the DBK system in Denmark, both within the framework and yet not compatible, has risen the idea of a deeper analysis of the theoretical basis for the ISO 12006-2 classification system to find a solution to this problem. The project has developed such a theoretical framework in order to clarify the relationship between classes representing parts of buildings in the ISO 12006-2 standard, specifically the Construction entity part, Element and Work result classes. This is specifically needed when the standard is used in the context of BIM, since building models include both specialization and compositional relations among information objects representing parts of buildings. The proposed theoretical framework is based on a systems view on the built environment that distinguishes constructions in four main compositional levels: construction entities, technical systems, building elements and components. Based on the theoretical framework developed in this project, possible new interpretations of the classification standard ISO 12006-2 are discussed.

Keywords: building classification, ISO 12006-2, BSAB, DBK

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (215,256 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


A. Gehre, P. Katranuschkov, R. J. Scherer

Managing virtual organization processes by semantic web ontologies

Abstract: Interoperability within Virtual Organisations (VOs) is still only weakly supported by IT frameworks. Whilst service level interoperability has made remarkable progress since the emergence and the rapid growth of SOA and Grid technology in the last years, business processes – which are the driving force of each VO – still suffer distinct conceptual gaps regarding their decomposition to technical transactions. There exists no detailed approach that would allow describing technical as well as business aspects in a coherent yet flexible and extensible way. This paper presents a newly developed semantic framework that targets this requirement. The conceptual background is followed by an introduction of the developed semantic web ontologies. Based on these definitions, dedicated Ontology Services as well as a set of related end-user applications facilitating semantic technology have been designed and implemented. They are presented in the second part of the paper. Reported are results from the EU project InteliGrid (IST-004664; 2004-2007).

Keywords: semantic web, ontologies, virtual organisation, process modelling, process management

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (973,369 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Amit Dayan and Rafael Sacks

Cognition Enhancement Using Virtual Reality in Apartment Customization

Abstract: The design and construction of customer configured apartments is challenging when customers are unable to interpret construction drawings or lack the knowledge or competence to deliver the decisions and information that is required from them. Builders dedicate significant managerial and technological effort to manage the customization process with their customers, and this process is commonly recognized to be inefficient. Studies suggest that one root cause is the fact that most customers are not construction professionals, hence decision making is often a challenging and sometimes unpleasant task for them due to insufficient product cognition. In this study we developed a virtual reality tool for the facilitation of an immersive presentation of yet to be built apartments to customers, speculating that cognition may be enhanced and facilitate the customization decisions. An experiment was conducted to identify and measure cognition differences. Some areas of measured cognition shown noticeable improvement which imply for significant cognition enhancement. Exploitation of the findings by future adoption of the examined method is discussed and suggested to construction companies.

Keywords: Product Customization, Apartment Design Changes, Virtual Reality, Residential Construction

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0184

Full text: content.pdf (1,565,663 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Aygun M, Cetiner I, Gocer C

A product model for the generation and evaluation of building element alternatives

Abstract: Thus a comprehensive yet versatile representation of all the entities involved in the building system is required, may these be notional or physical entities. The intention here is to provide a parametric conceptual model for generating and evaluating alternatives of functional building elements for ascertaining the best overall performer. The proposal enshrines three interrelated subsystems. The first two are concerned with constraints and performance requirements respectively as notional entities and the third with physical objects related to buildings. The discrete performance requirements for a descendant are interpreted as functions of ancestors in the context of the physical model. Hence element requirements are designated to discrete components as their functions. Each component contained within an element serves one or more primary functions. Conversely each of the latter is served by one or more components.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (179,189 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.analysis (0.013328) class.represent (0.009876)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Babic N C, Rebolj D, Hanzic L, Tibaut A

Transfer of road product model usage from academia to practice

Abstract: In Civil Engineering Informatics Centre at the Faculty of Civil Engineering, we are engaged in product models of construction objects. In product models, we see the key for integration of life cycle activities in the construction of individual objects. These activities are being weakly connected. Working on it, we have been focusing specially in the road design field. In the past few years we have developed a road model, called MCT, which is based on geometric road design. As a part of this project we have also made an application prototype, that uses advantages of MCT and enables simple road data transfer among particular life cycle phases. Yet in the early stage of our research project we were aware that our findings have to be tested in practise as soon as possible. Project was funded in part by the government institution that controls road building in Slovenia. For this reason we expected the investor to animate contractors to exchange data with our model. Unfortunately our expectations were not completely fulfilled and therefore the model wasn't verified in practise. Since we believe our model can rationalise road building procedure, we decided to carry out some extra activities, which would stimulate model usage. Therefore we established direct contact with some contractors involved in specific road life cycle phases. This wasn't an easy job, because a great number of small organisations are involved. Contractor's work is usually very clearly defined and computer is just a tool that helps him to do it quicker and better. For this purpose some extra functional modules of Road life-cycle environment (RO) were made and the existing ones were conformed according to the contractors needs. Since contractors are already using particular software to support their engineering process, we also persuaded software producers to include MCT in their programs for road design. This way, we gained broad software support for our model. Article fully describes a road model MCT, Road life-cycle environment RO and especially our efforts to introduce MCT into engineering practise.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (137,514 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.bestPractise (0.092140) class.processing (0.017632) class.education (0.016155)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Bjork, Bo-Christer

Requirements and information structures for building product data models

Abstract: The term computer-integrated construction (CIC) is often used to describe a future type of construction process characterised by the extensive use of information technology. The key to successful CIC is the comprehensive integration of currently isolated computing applications in different phases of the construction process. Among the several types of data exchange standards needed to support such integration, the standards for structuring the information describing buildings (building product data models) are particularly important. No fully operational building product data models have as yet been formally standardised either on the national or international level, but the topic has been a subject of intensive research during the last few years. Building product data model proposals are usually defined using object-oriented information modelling techniques. The research which is presented in this summarising thesis was carried out primarily during the years 1988-92 at the Technical Research Centre of Finland. The report begins with a brief introduction to the general background of research concerning CIC and building product data models. Fundamental concepts of object orientation and product modelling are explained in a separate chapter. In order to position the author's research results, the "state of the art" in this research field is briefly reviewed. The research results are presented against the background of a kernel-aspect model framework, in line with current thinking among several leading researchers in this field. The results can loosely be classified into three distinctive groups: a number of requirements which building product data models should fulfil; specific information structures in building product data models; and the integration of product models with other types of information used in the construction process. The specific information structures which were studied include the abstraction hierarchies used in building product data models, the type object mechanism and information structures needed for modelling spaces and enclosing objects. The report ends with a discussion of the results, comparing them with the proposals and results of other researchers. Some directions for further research are also outlined.

Keywords: Building Product model, computer-integrated construction

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (515,455 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: other (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Bloomfield D P

The role of case studies in the uptake of innovation in construction

Abstract: The UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions has initiated a Construction Best Practice programme. The primary objective is to improve management best practices. The technical performance of the industry also needs to be improved by identifying and promoting opportunities for industry to adopt new technical innovations and incorporate them into standard practices. Accordingly, a series of Technical Best Practice initiatives will be set up. One of these will cover Construction IT. It is expected that Case Study material will form an important element of the IT Best Practice programme. Concrete examples of use of technology in practice are likely to be more convincing than simple exhortations and theoretical reports. There are three major issues that need to be addressed. 1. A Case Study is, by its nature, very specific and it can be difficult for the reader to ascertain if there is sufficient commonality between the problem described and the situation that he/she faces in order to assess whether the solutions are applicable. 2. It is difficult to describe the problem and solutions in sufficient detail, yet in a way that encourages the material to be read, understood and used. Ideally a common format needs to be developed for describing the key facts. 3. A further aspect of importance is how to determine what applications are most in need of Case Studies. Limited resources are available and it is essential that these are targeted in such a way as to produce maximum returns for the industry as a whole. This paper describes a framework for addressing these three issues and will provide an update of the work of the UK Construction IT Technical Best Practice programme.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (48,114 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.environment (0.009079) class.social (0.005934) class.legal (0.002856)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Bouchlaghem D, Rezgui Y, Hassanen M, Cooper G, Rose D

IT tools and support for improved briefing

Abstract: "The briefing stage is critical to the success of construction projects, however it is widely recognised that improvements are needed in this process in order to reduce the cost and optimise quality of buildings. Briefing involves understanding the client's needs and expressing them in a way that will ensure compatibility between the client's vision of the project and the resulting product. There are problems encountered in construction briefing which involve both clients and designers. There is little guidance and support for clients, whilst designers have difficulties both in capturing clients’ needs and conveying conceptual design options to them. There is a central difficulty, associated with language, communication and the exchange of information between clients and design teams, which is now gaining widespread acknowledgement. The CoBrITe (LINK/IDAC UK funded) project argues that the construction industry has yet to exploit the potential of IT systems to assist both parties during this critical phase. This is in contrast to later stages of design and construction where computer-based techniques and systems are commonplace. The overall aim of the CoBrITe project is to improve the briefing process through more efficient and effective use of existing and emerging information technologies that can support client and design teams. The project builds on the recent IDAC 88 project: Managing the Brief as a Process of Innovation, and its five key action areas for improvement: empowering the client, managing the project dynamics, appropriate team building, appropriate visualisation techniques, and appropriate user involvement. It is driven by the needs of solving challenges within the briefing and related design process, with IT a means to an end. The project brings together a group of companies from across the construction supply chain to work together towards the above aim. The methodology comprises: -An extensive literature review on construction briefing focusing on the process of briefing, human and cultural issues, and IT applications and their role within the process. ·The integration of the recent and current projects on briefing through interviews, establishing an electronic network and holding workshops. ·The formulation of a framework of enabling technologies and their potential role in facilitating the briefing process and overcoming human and organisational constraints. ·The development of a model which will facilitate the integration of activities and information sharing in the briefing process. The proposed paper will give a comprehensive overview of the CoBrITe project, including an analysis of the briefing practices and information requirement, an initial CoBrITe Briefing Process Model, the CoBrITe system architecture, and the description of the proposed framework that integrates a set of proprietary and commercial software applications aimed at supporting the briefing process."

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (319,634 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.roadmaps (0.015409) class.processing (0.014768) class.economic (0.012134)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Brien M J O', Al-Biqami N M

Survey of information technology and the structure of the Saudi Arabian construction industry

Abstract: While technical advances are the main drivers in the adoption of Information Technology (IT) in the construction industry, such advances can only be incorporated through a due appreciation of the structures of the industry. Earlier work has shown how the organisational structure of the industry is in large part determined by the nature of the economic and financial exchanges which takes place. New IT initiatives succeed to the degree to which they are congruent with those financial exchanges. In short, economic benefits must accrue. This in turn begs the questions: who benefits, and how are the benefits to be distributed amongst the various parties? The answers to these questions provide the basis for establishing a successful implementation. This short-term 'economic benefits' argument does not, however, preclude a more substantial organisational shift at some later point. In this paper we provide an analysis of the economic structure of the construction industry in Saudi Arabia, and in particular the degree to which IT has established itself in that industrial sector. The Saudi Arabian Construction industry is one of the largest in the world, being devoted to the provision of a large-scale infrastructure. However, in many of its characteristics it is unique. It is these elements of uniqueness which make this particular industry interesting: the uniqueness poses new problems for the developers of novel and innovative IT construction systems. Yet despite these aggregate figures and anecdotal facts the small-scale nature of the construction industry has been poorly researched and documented. The analysis of the economic and organisational structure of the Saudi Arabian IT construction industry provided in this paper provides the fine-grained matrix within which new IT systems can be built. The paper describes an ongoing study of the Saudi Arabian construction industry. It draws together existing facts on the industry and new ones which are being elicited though a large survey of the industry. Finally, it is envisioned that tentative conclusions will be provided on the economic and organisational structure of the industry.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (82,648 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.economic (0.028723) class.strategies (0.014463) class.roadmaps (0.014116)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
this is page 1 show page 2 show page 3 show page 4 show page 5 show page 6 ... show page 8 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003