Works : Search Results

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E Ergen, A Dikbas,I Tekce, D Ilter, H Giritli, M Jablonski, A Kowalska

Investigation of price banks and life cycle inventoriesfor pan-European life cycle costanalysis system

Abstract: When comparing alternative strategies for a project, owners and users should not only consider the initial capital cost, but also the running costs which are incurred over its operating life. Total life cycle cost (LCC) is a recognized approach to identify the future total cost implications of individual building elements or the entire building in the future. However, as sustainability gained significance in the construction industry, it became clear that LCC is not the only the only factor to be considered. Life cycle assessment (LCA) of a building is also of great importance. LCA need to be performed to determine the effect of the construction and constructed structure on the environment (i.e., CO2 emission). To provide comparable LCC and LCA results and outputs, significant amount of work is needed to normalize data in existing sources. This paper describes the characteristics of the current databases that can be integrated with the Pan-European life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) system, which is an ongoing EU 7th framework CILECCTA (Construction Industry LifE Cycle Cost Analysis software) project. The goal of the CILECCTA project is to develop an online decision support system for assessment and identification sustainable and economic options for pan-European construction and renovation projects. This tool will provide comparable LCC and LCA results for different project options and assist users in selecting the most appropriate option. It will be compatible with various price banks which supply necessary data for LCC, and life cycle inventories (LCIs) that provide data for LCA across Europe and beyond. The tool will also allow for consideration of uncertainty (e.g., in design and functionality), which is inherent in construction, renovation and through life cycle of a structure. The objective of this paper is to describe the main characteristics (e.g., classification systems, data availability) of existing price banks and LCA databases in Europe.

Keywords: Life Cycle Assessment, Life Cycle Cost, Life Cycle Inventory, Price Bank

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Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Edwin Dado, Reza Beheshti, Sander van Nederveen

IT education and utilization within the upcoming shared master of science in construction management and engineering in the Netherlands

Abstract: In March 2004, the Task Force Sector Plan presented their final report to the State Secretary of Educa-tion, Culture and Science. In this report, the three universities of technology (3TU) proposed how they aim to create a single federation of Dutch universities of technology by combining their education and research programmes in order to enhance knowledge valorisation. In addition, five shared Master of Science (MSc.) programmes - not yet offered in The Netherlands but considered to be essential for the Dutch knowledge economy - were proposed, including the MSc. Construction Management and Engineering (CME) programme. The MSc. CME programme, realized at the three 3TU locations, consists of two blocks: (1) a general block and (2) a specialization block. The general block covers the topics that provide a sound basis for further specialization at one of the three locations of the 3TU. Within the general block – but moreover in the specialization block offered in Delft – contains a large amount of IT education and utilization. This paper will discuss the overall programme of MSc. CME programme and the development process of the MSc. CME specialization in Delft, with a special emphasis on the IT related subjects.

Keywords: master programme, construction management, IT, education

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Series: w78:2007 (browse)
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Engdahl S

Product identification systems for construction and facility management

Abstract: This paper presents a study of the concept of a common construction product identification system with a focus on the establishment of principles for its use within computer integrated construction and facility management processes. An analysis of current systems for product identification utilized within the Swedish sector of construction and facility management is presented in an addition with a discussion of the concept of object and class identification in information systems development. The study is a part of the industry doctorate research project ‘Product information in computer-integrated construction and facility management processes’, which aims at studying methods for handling product information and contribute to the development of computer based systems for product information management. A main hypothesis within this project is that an information platform enabling efficient integration of IT in handling construction product information is composed of an identification-, classification-, and an attribute system. These components should be mutually independent and implemented as sector wide standards. This study specifically deals with the first component, a common system for identification of construction products. During recent years an increasing amount of research has been dedicated to define methods to integrate and utilize information technology in handling the vast amount of information used, created and transferred within construction and facility management processes. In Sweden, the focus has been on classification systems and product models as central means for establishing a framework for information handling. A common system for product identification would in general facilitate handling of product information in computer integrated construction and facility management processes. Specific advantages would be to enable; - Dynamic invocation of distributed components (e.g. CORBA) representing the product via a link relation residing in a database connected to the Internet. - Direct product information retrieval in case of a present identifier on a product, catalogue page or advertisement. - Exactness in production follow-up, i.e. when consumed production resources are registered. A common system for product identification is considered to be relatively easy to define and implement in comparison with common standards for product classification, attributes and product models, since the latter ones are aspect dependent and involve numerous actors and divergent interests. The purpose of this study is to identify and analyze current systems for product identification used within the Swedish sector of construction and to demonstrate the role of such systems in IT based environments for handling construction product information. The study shows that separate actors within the building process so far have developed systems for product identification without support for the process as a whole. Among the systems analyzed is EAN-13 regarded as most suitable since it is international, non-sector specific, in correspondence with a barcode standard for automatic data capture and has the widest propagation. However, the EAN-13 system, like the other systems, lacks explicit norms that guarantee valid identification in a historical perspective especially required for product information management within facility management processes. EAN-13’s main disadvantage in the construction context is its total focus on trade items, thus its deficient handling of standard product units, which is the common view for actors outside the sector of trading. The conclusion implies that a common system for product identification with characteristics of being international, non-sector specific, without property or class referencing attributes and with explicit criteria regarding changes of identifiers as a result of property alteration would be most advantageous and that such system is a central component in an information platform with means for achieving efficient utilization of IT. None of the systems in current use is featured with all these characteristics.

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Full text: content.pdf (527,797 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.retrieve (0.020441) class.software-software (0.015031) class.bestPractise (0.012129)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


FL Ribeiro

Using experience based cases to support construction business processes

Abstract: Many business processes in the construction supply chains involve creation and consumption of massive amount of knowledge. Some construction organisations may use such knowledge as a competitive differentiator. The benefits that an organisation in the supply and value chain reaps from relevant experiences will also be beneficial to the organisation's clients, suppliers, and business partners. However, there is normally a lack of explicit knowledge about their business processes.

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Series: w78:2005 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


Galjaard H C, Vos C J, Kunst S

EUROCADCRETE - an improved design exercise in reinforced concrete

Abstract: "The paper will present the results of 10 years of experience with a CAD/CAL reinforced concrete design exercise at Delft University of Technology. The exercise was developed in 1988 and 1989, implemented in 1989 for a test and in 1990 for regular use. Over 1200 students have used it since then. Students were asked to size and detail components of a simple reinforced concrete building, consisting out of columns, slabs and continuous beams at a workstation of the university CAD-Training Centre. The computer checked the results, gave feedback on these results, and let the students correct them until found satisfactory. Although the exercise was quite successful in the beginning, the success decreased in time because equipment and software got out-fashioned compared to other hard- and software students could use. Another drawback of the program was the very strict checking criteria used, which often tempted the students to solve the problem by ‘trial and error’. This didactic unwanted situation was also reason to improve the program. In 1999 the workstations have been removed and the exercise could not be continued any more. From several options available for the development of a new exercise, like upgrading the program or developing a complete new program, it was decided to adapt a commercially available program. In joint venture with a Software consultant, Matrix Software bv, a complete new exercise is being developed, tested and implemented. The exercise is based on the existing commercial software from this company for the design of concrete structures. Another reason to select this program for the development of the exercise is that it is already being used for structural analysis at the university. The program has several new features compared with the first one. It tries to implement some engineering judgement, by asking the student for answers based on rules of thumb, before computer-calculations are started. Furthermore the computer will not tell whether something is right or wrong according the code but it will show the result, leaving the judgement to the student. Another improvement will be that the exercise will contain some exercise in estimating and parameter-studies, asking for the effects of increase and decrease of sizes on the costs of a structure. The student can get help from the computer on different levels. Counting the amount and level of help being required and the time consumed may be used for a judgement. The program will use Eurocode 2 and will be made available for users who are interested all through Europe. The paper will not only describe the program, but will deal with the technical and educational results of the first implementation in spring 2000."

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Full text: content.pdf (311,657 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.analysis (0.024726) class.impact (0.022326) class.software development (0.019486)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Guarnerio G

Automation of technical information systems

Abstract: The paper is a synthesis of two research works: .Automation of Technical Information Systemsu and 4lassification Systems for the Construction Industry)), which have been funded by Progetto Finaliuato Edilizia (Italian National Council of Research). The design of buildings currently requires a huge amount of processed data, due to various procedural routines required for obtaining the necessary authorizations. Such documents are usually drawn up on paper: information technology allows t o perform in a simpler and systematic way all data managed and to enhance process efficiency in the construction industry.

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Series: ecce:1997 (browse)
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Ipek Gursel, Rudi Stouffs, Sevil Sariyildiz

A computational framework for integration of performance information during the building lifecycle

Abstract: Optimal indoor environments in terms of thermal comfort and indoor air quality are essential to maintain healthy and productive spaces. To address the high occupant comfort and energy efficiency requirements, advanced HVAC systems that have narrow performance boundaries are used. It is crucial to achieve the satisfactory operational level for systems and buildings by the adoption of performance based verification strategies. Performance-based approach requires the continuous verification of the actual performance against objectives during the building lifecycle. Building commissioning, building energy management systems (BEMS) and operations and main-tenance are effective tools to verify optimum building performance and have the potential to embed performance as-sessment into the building lifecycle. However, transfer of performance information from one method or building phase to another is difficult. A considerable amount of valuable information is lost due to the lack of an integrated framework that bridges different islands of information. This becomes most problematic during the operational phase, where de-sign data and performance trends are the main basis for decision making for facilities management staff. To achieve a persistent performance evaluation across phases and stakeholders, a flexible and seamless communication infrastruc-ture across disciplines and processes is necessary. The software architecture for a continuous performance verification and communication environment for indoor cli-mate and ventilation systems is introduced. The purpose of the model is to provide a framework that integrates commis-sioning, BEMS monitoring and inspection/maintenance activities, to avoid erosion of domain information during hand-overs and over time. The model retains continual information of building and makes this information available during building operations and [re]commissioning. A formal relationship structure is proposed between performance indices to support traceability of design and operations decisions. The paper will be concluded with reflections into the future work, which includes implementation and proposed strategies for validation of the model by test cases.

Keywords: building lifecycle performance assessment, building commissioning, BEMS

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Series: w78:2007 (browse)
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Jahnkassim P-S,Abakr Y,Ibrahim I-F

Integrating simulation and visualisation for energy efficiency in a large public mall in the tropics

Abstract: This paper reports on a case study that involved an integrated design process of a large commercial development. In particular, it utilized simulation and visualization to inform strategic design decisions that could reduce heat gain while admitting usable daylight. Additionally, the design intended to avoid extensive air conditioning energy of a large shopping mall in the tropical context of Malaysia. Simulation inputs were presented to a design team throughout the design process and on completion of the building, post occupancy studies were carried out to verify the results. At present, air conditioning is not used in large common public areas and hence, this case study represents a successful application of simulation and visualization tools of such context. The airflow and monitored temperature results verified the simulation output - however, the daylight measurement recorded higher distribution compared to the predicted performance. This may be due to the standard use of 10 k Cie overcast sky in simulation to represent the worst cloudy scenario in Malaysia. Regardless, the results will benefit future planners and developers of large shopping malls by recommending the integrated design process. This process introduces the usage of strategic passive design approach that can save a large amount of energy used in common areas.

Keywords: multivolume,atria,canopy,thermal comfort,bioclimatic,ventilation

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Series: convr:2013 (browse)
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Jakob Beetz, Leon van Berlo, Ruben de Laat, Pim van den Helm

BIMSERVER.Org – An Open Source IFC Model Server

Abstract: In this paper we introduce the ongoing development of a free and open model server to persist, maintain and manage instance models of the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) format. By using open standards, robust existing software frameworks, best practices and workflows accepted in the broader software engineering world as the basis of our framework, we hope to gain traction within the research and development community by creating a completely open reference implementation that is free to use and extend within individual research projects and commercial applications. By providing an open and extendable architecture around a robust and performant kernel we hope to be able to encourage the integration of many earlier and current efforts that have been undertaken in the field of IFC-based model processing.We describe the set of features implemented so far and give an outline of a roadmap for future developments. Some of these implemented features include: User management, up- and downloads of models, a check-out and check-in mechanism and versioning. As part of this versioning mechanism we show a tree comparison algorithm that allows the creation of version-deltas we refer to as change sets. These change sets are used to minimize the amount of traffic to and from the central repository by only communicating its differences. All server-side functionality described here is exposed through a web-service API which has been used to implement web-based and standalone client applications. A filtering mechanism allows the extraction of sub-models such as specific element types. We show how we transform original STEP part 11 EXPRESS schemas into a Meta-Object-Facility (MOF), and store them in XMI/EMF models. Furthermore, we describe how our framework provides a mapping to a BerkeleyDB database facilitating its rich set of features. We demonstrate how we use a suite of more than 1600 IFC models from various sources to test the integrity of the framework. To demonstrate that our framework works efficiently enough for real-world building model scenarios, we provide some performance indicators using this extensive suite of test models.We finish our report by laying out some of the ideas and plans for the future development of the server which include query languages (for the definition of IDMs etc.), a viewer (e.g. for the visualization of differences between model versions) and the integration of other model schemas such as the ISO 12006-3.

Keywords: IFC, model server, BIM, CAD, collaboration

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Series: w78:2010 (browse)
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Jeehee Lee, June-Seong Yi, Jeongwook Son and Ye-Eun Jang

Pre-Bid Clarification for Construction Project Risk Identification Using Unstructured Text Data Analysis

Abstract: This paper analysed construction bidding information in order to define risk factors that can be appeared in the bid documents of construction projects. For this purpose, text analysis was conducted on biddersÕ inquiry information (Pre-bid RFI), which inquires uncertain information and omissions in the bid documents in order for pre-bid clarification. From the results of the analysis, what types of risk factors exist in the bid documents and what parts of the bid documents can be pre-reviewed to proactively respond to the uncertain ownerÕs requirements. The results are expected to be used as important information for pre-bid clarification of bid documents. Moreover, this study can be meaningful in that it provides a comprehensive way to grasp a large amount of 1,054 documents without analysing the contents of individual documents directly through analysis of bidding information of construction projects using text mining.

Keywords: Bid Documents, Pre-Bid Clarification, BiddersÕ Inquiries, Text Mining

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0028

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