Works : Search Results

Hits 31 to 40 of 61

Maryam Montazer, Danijel Rebolj and Detlef Heck

A Comparison Review of Automated Construction Scheduling Methods

Abstract: Scheduling is considered the major part of the planning phase in construction project life cycle. Traditional manual scheduling methods, especially in large-scale projects with huge amount of activities and various construction methods and resource types still remain as the time-consuming, error-prone and complex process. Therefore, diverse construction framework and templates have been developed to automatically generate the construction schedules, not only to increase the accuracy and speed of scheduling but also to decrease the substantial manual efforts in construction project planning, significantly. This article reviews the research on automated construction scheduling and classifies them into three main categories including the Artificial intelligence (AI)-based scheduling, simulation-based scheduling and integrated BIM-based scheduling. The strengths and weaknesses of some specific methods are identified and discussed. Finally, advantages of Integrated BIM-based scheduling in comparison with other methods have been demonstrated, and a new direction for further research indicated.

Keywords: Automated Construction Scheduling, Simulation Based Scheduling, Knowledge-Based Scheduling, Integrated BIM-Based Scheduling

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0010

Full text: content.pdf (659,336 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Miyatake Y, Yamazaki Y, Kangari R

Tbe SMART system project: a strategy for management of information and automation technology in computer integrated construction

Abstract: In today's construction industry, information and automation technology must be viewed as potential resources. Computer Integrated Construction (CIC) is an emerging technology, and it is an approach to assisting construction f m s respond to the difficult environment in which they are operating currently. There is no standard formula for CIC. A strategy for implementing CIC should be formulated, and promoted at the highest company level. To demonstrate the concept of CIC, a prototype system should be introduced to investigate integration problems. It only presents a way of approaching the CIC. SMART (Shimizu Manufacturing system by Advanced Robotics Technology) system is a part of Shimizu s strategy for developing CIC based on site automation systems which automates a wide range of construction process. It also integrates a wide range of design, planning and management activities of the project. By introducing SMART system, amount of labour required and the construction period are both reduced significantly, and the planning and management productivity is increased. The objective of this paper is to describe the strategy in management of information and automation technology development from a Japanese construction company' s view point, and to present a prototype made1 for CIC implementation. Although the prototype system is not established as a comprehensive system, it can be viewed as a strategy toward a total CIC.

Keywords: automation; computer; integration; construction; robotics; information

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (813,241 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Naaranoja M, Oestman L

Information technology strategies and adaptation of knowledge - a conceptual analysis in the construction industry

Abstract: The goal of this study is to construct an understanding of preparations, made for strategic decisions of information technology. The focus is on adaptation of knowledge and the types of knowledge adapted. The study concentrates on the software and hardware used for producing drawings and specifications in the construction industry - the companies suffer an unpredictable market environment and a large amount of published data. The study is based on two case studies - made in two different companies – a multinational with operations in different countries, the other a medium size, mainly active on the regional market. Both of the companies are forced to make development decisions about information technology by estimating future benefits, costs, risks and intangible values. This should evolve from a thorough reflection based on selected information and an assessment of the situational data. According to their attitude towards CAD development these companies belong to different classes: pioneer and follower. The pioneer makes a broad scope selection of information and organises it for decision making. The follower estimates both the benefits of the software and the actions of the competitors. He calculates the revenues and costs carefully before the decision. There is a large amount of information offered by software developers, scientist and other experts. On the other hand the knowledge needed for strategic decisions has to be inside the company. According to the pragmatist philosophy, knowledge is gained through elaboration of experiences. In a fast developing field - such as software development and communication tools - the possibility of gaining experiences is good. The problem is - due to continuous progress - that new experiences are the only that can help you construct adequate knowledge. Sustainable decisions need to be based on long term experience, but in the case of information technology, the emphasis must

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (50,324 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.strategies (0.026554) class.synthesis (0.015250) class.software development (0.012514)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Obonyo E A, Anumba C J, Thorpe A

Specification and procurement of construction products: the case for an agent-based system

Abstract: This paper presents a justification for APRON (Agent-based Specification and Procurement of Construction Products). This is an ongoing research project aimed at developing an agent-based prototype system for the specification and procurement of construction products. The resulting prototype system will reduce the excessive amount of time spent acquiring information and gaining knowledge about various artifacts. This paper presents a case for deploying agents to assist specifiers and procurers of construction products. It introduces the subject of specification and procurement, highlighting the problems encountered in executing these two tasks. It also described what software agents are and distinguishes them from other closely related paradigms. The paper then presents a case for agents in the selected domain of specification and procurement of construction products. This is followed by a discussion on the features of APRON system. The paper concludes that the specification and procurements of construction products is an appropriate domain for the deployment of software agents.

Keywords: software agents, construction products, specification, procurement, Internet

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,070,079 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: itaec:2004 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Pilgrim M, Bouchlaghem D, Holmes M, Loveday D

Visualisation in building design and analysis

Abstract: "Research on data visualisation is undergoing major developments in a number of different fields. These developments include investigating ways of applying visualisation techniques and systems for more efficient manipulation, interpretation and presentation of data. Research into applied visualisation has so far taken place in the fields of Computational Fluid Dynamics, Medicine, Social Sciences, and the Environment. In the built environment field however, the potential of new visualisation technologies to enhance the presentation of performance data from simulation programmes (of the type used by engineering design consultants, for example) has remained almost unexplored. Improvements in this area would lead to a better and more efficient use of these simulation programs and would facilitate the interpretation of such output data by construction industry professionals, leading to better, more informed design decisions. This paper presents an initial study on Data Visualisation and its effective use in the thermal analysis of buildings. Much of the current data visualisation in the engineering and scientific world focuses on very large data sets produced by applications such as FEA, CFD or GIS. As such the tools developed to date are often too expensive or not appropriate for the visualisation of the relatively smaller data sets produced by thermal analysis tools. The objective of the work summarised here was to develop a method of visualising the data produced by the thermal analysis tools which would run on an average desktop PC and be easy to maintain/customise and above all present the data in an intuitive manner. A workplace observational study of several engineers performing such an analysis revealed each was spending a significant amount of time manipulating the output within commercial spreadsheet packages. Further studies revealed the most common tasks were the inspection of predicted internal conditions, location of glazed elements transmitting significant solar radiation and the identification of high internal surface temperatures. Two applications were therefore proposed. The first is designed to automatically process the output within the spreadsheet environment. The second is designed to display the solution in three dimensions to aid spatial recognition and data navigation. The spreadsheet tools were developed over a period of several months and then released to all users of the analysis tools. The 3D tool was developed over a longer period and has been subjected to small group tests. Each tool was developed using Microsoft Visual Basic making them both easy to maintain and freely available. The 3D tool reads in flat text files produced by the analysis and automatically generates a framed HTML page with an embedded 3D VRML world describing the building and its results. This study shows that each of the proposed applications significantly improves some of the attributes associated with usability, namely; learnability, efficiency, memorability, errors and satisfaction. The spreadsheet tool increased efficiency and decreased errors but offered no real satisfaction. The 3D tool offers increased satisfaction but at present does not efficiently present all of the data required. Finally, It is possible to develop low cost Data Visualisation tools to improve the overall usability of a thermal analysis tool within a built environment consultantcy."

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (404,505 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.social (0.027102) class.environment (0.018138) class.economic (0.016196)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


R Amor & K Xu

Automated classification of A/E/C web content

Abstract: The amount of useful information available on the web for A/E/C professionals increases inexorably. Numerous search engines allow users to identify potentially useful information in this vast resource, though the majority of these systems work purely on the search terms entered by the user. This means that the web pages which are found are often not as relevant to the user's needs as would be expected. What is returned is certainly far from the promise of the semantic web where the properties of the content can be readily ascertained. To help address this issue the authors adapt the Latent Semantic Indexing algorithm to enable web pages and sites to be automatically matched to codes in a classification system. This paper discusses the issues involved in developing such a system for A/E/C as well as measuring the results in comparison to the general search engines currently available to professionals.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (308,116 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2005 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


Rafia M Y

Optimum building concept generation and integration of design process using a structured genetic algorithm

Abstract: The paper investigates the application of a structured Genetic Algorithm (sGA) to the structural design of buildings. The current research aim is to develop a decision support system to assist the designer at the conceptual stage of the design process where important decisions which influence the future of projects, are made; a very significant amount of the total project cost is committed at this stage. The paper also discusses the possibility of the integration of design activities of disciplines involved in the design process, using the sGA. Methodologies of using sGA are introduced and some of the shortcomings of the sGA are identified.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf ( bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: ecce:1997 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Rasys E,Hodds M,Dawood N,Kassem M

A web3d enabled information integration framework for facility management

Abstract: Managing capital oil and gas and civil engineering facilities requires a large amount of heterogeneous information that is generated by different project stakeholders across the facility lifecycle phases and stored in various databases and technical documents. The amount of information reaches its peak during the commissioning and handover phases when the project is handed over to the operator. The operational phase of facilities spans multiple decades and the way facilities are used and maintained have a huge impact on costs, environment, productivity, and health and safety. Thus, the client and the operator bear most of the additional costs associated with incomplete, incorrect or not immediately usable information. Web applications can provide a quick and convenient access to information regardless of user location. However, the integration and delivery of engineering information, including 3D content, over the Web is still at its infancy and is affected by numerous technical (i.e. data and tools) and procedural (i.e. process and people) challenges. This paper addresses the technical issues and proposes a WEB3D-enabled information integration framework that delivers engineering information together with 3D content without any plug-ins. In the proposed framework, a class library defines the engineering data requirements and a semi-structured database provides means to integrate heterogeneous technical asset information. This framework also enables separating the 3D model content into fragments, storing them together with the digital assets and delivering to the client browser on demand. Such framework partially alleviates the current limitations of the JavaScript based 3D content delivery such as application speed and latency. Hence, the proposed framework is particularly valuable to petroleum and civil engineering companies working with large amounts of data.

Keywords: Information integration,Facility Management,Class Library,Web3D,WebGL

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (984,688 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2013 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Robert Klinc, Matevž Dolenc, Žiga Turk

POSSIBLE BENEFITS OF WEB 2.0 TO CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

Abstract: Despite the fact that it has taken a long time for construction industry to enter the information era, information technologies (IT) significantly changed and still changes the way professionals in building and construction (BC) industry work. Consequently, construction industry is in relatively early phase of adopting web-based technology, even though the web has already moved deep into its second phase. During the recent years, a phenomenon of Web 2.0 attracted a lot of attention not only in the Internet, but also in business community. It is considered as a next step and a major evolution of the traditional web from both a technological and social perspective. New on-line applications not only make tasks as individual and group on-line learning, communication, collaboration and creation easier, they also have the capability of upgrading the experience by using the vast amount of information from the Internet, previous sessions and so called collective intelligence of its users.The possible benefits of adapting Web 2.0 technologies, principles and strategies into construction industry are numerous. Using new approaches can affect marketing strategies, data and information exchange, customer contacts, life cycle management, knowledge management and can result in substantial savings in time and money, customers' satisfaction, improved internal and external communication and collaboration, etc. What is more, shift towards modern web can also have a positive impact on the name and brand of the company.This paper presents the concepts which can affect the way how construction industry currently works and the key reasons why the AEC community should seriously consider the shift towards the next generation of the web.

Keywords: Web 2.0, Enterprise 2.0

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (277,558 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2008 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Robert-Nicoud Y, Raphael B, Smith I

Decision support through multiple models and probabilistic search

Abstract: "A large number of candidate behaviour models may exist for existing civil engineering structures such as bridges. Finding the right model for explaining a given set of observations is a difficult task. Traditionally, modelling assumptions are made without adequate justifications and verifications. Manually constructing multiple models and comparing their behaviour with measurements is arduous and hence, we are developing support tools for engineers. Techniques of model composition and model reuse are used for systematically constructing and evaluating multiple models. In this paper, experiments in model construction for the Lutrive bridge in Switzerland and their results are reported. The Lutrive bridge was constructed in 1972 using the cantilever method with central hinges. It is found that the bridge continues to creep significantly even after twenty-seven years of construction. However, load tests indicate that the bridge possesses unusually high rigidity and earlier theoretical models (constructed manually) gave results that were different from displacement measurements by as much as 100%. It was necessary to evaluate different modelling possibilities in order to obtain reasonable correlation with measurement data. The approach we have used is summarised in the following steps: ? Cases consisting of candidate models are constructed manually. ? Spaces of behaviour represented by each case are defined. ? The total solution space which is a union of the spaces represented by individual cases is searched using a new probability-based algorithm. The following conclusions were drawn from the above approach: ? If a model contains enough number of parameters as observation points it may be possible to get an exact match by tuning values of parameters. However, certain models are capable of representing only a few modes of behaviour and no combination of parameter values might exist that explain the observed behaviour. ? Model creation in a domain such as structural engineering requires considerable amount of skill. Storing cases consisting of complete models is a means of reusing such expertise. ? Model construction is a search problem. Evolutionary and stochastic search techniques produce good results when used in combination with cases."

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (466,067 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.impact (0.017941) class.retrieve (0.013831) class.environment (0.011624)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


For more results click below:

show page 1show page 2show page 3this is page 4show page 5show page 6show page 7