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Akbas R, Fischer M, Kunz J, Schwegler B

Use of domain knowledge, product models and geometric algorithms for generation of construction zones

Abstract: We present a layered approach for automated generation of construction zones from 3D CAD models for construction planning and scheduling. The existence of 3D models and product models provides an opportunity for planners and schedulers to consider zoning alternatives and represent and visualize production information in detail. Construction zones are spaces, or groups of spaces, which serve as units of work in the construction planning process. Failure to define construction zones properly may increase overall project duration and impact workflow adversely. Today, zone definitions are generally ad-hoc. Formal definitions and mechanisms to generate construction zone information are not available in commercially available software.We have defined a three-layer computational framework in a prototype construction management software tool to generate detailed information about construction zones. The framework separates the construction-based information from the product model representation and geometric information. Each layer is extensible and testable without the other layers. The highest layer (Layer3) contains domain knowledge about zones, i.e., types of zones and factors or constraints affecting construction zone definition. For example, a shape factor takes into account the changes in production rates due to local variations of geometry. The shape factor also allows the representation of an idle crew because of a nearby activity, missing support or unavailability of materials. Layer 2 manages the changes in the product and process models that are necessary to generate zones. Additionally, it uses zoning knowledge to maintain consistent schedules at multiple levels of detail. Layer 1 is the geometric level that contains the geometric algorithms to create the subdivisions and aggregations using the geometric shape representation of the building components. Instead of considering a fixed geometric representation for a component, we provide a flexible triangular mesh shape representation, breaking-up or aggregating component geometry as necessary. With the results of this research, professionals will be able to simulate and visualize construction processes more accurately and link design and construction data more tightly to explore design-build scenarios rapidly and communicate them effectively.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,076,021 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.impact (0.028985) class.environment (0.026386) class.represent (0.022098)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Dylan John, Yunfeng Chen, Robert Cox and Qian Huang

USA PractitionersÕ Perception of BIM Maturity

Abstract: This paper examines the USA practitionerÕs perspective of Building Information Modeling Maturity (BIMM). The objective is to better identify the BIMM indicators from practitionersÕ perspective as it would provide better insight and feedback into the use and practice of BIM in the USA industry. This would help fill the gap in understanding and breaking down the complexity of BIM and will allow for better approaches to BIM education and more tangible adoption in Industry. The study is structured based off the four BIMM factors of Technology, Information, Process and People. A survey was used as the research methodology with a breakdown of the survey responses based on their business type and number of years working with BIM. The research findings indicate that Information is the most important maturity factor, followed by Process and the lowest ranked maturity factor is People followed by Technology. The findings of this study has both academic and industry value as it gives greater insight to the practitioners perspective of the different maturity indicators and as such can be used to develop better BIM education and industry adoption practices.

Keywords: BIM, Maturity, USA, Practitioner

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0155

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Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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P Racky

Linking up versus Breaking down: Demands on Cost Estimating for Turn-key Construction Projects

Abstract: The complete monetary valuation of interfaces between the various building elements or work packages is a substantial success factor for a correct estimate that takes account of all costs of turn-key construction projects. The estimating processes employed by construction contractors often neglect systematic interface analysis what leads to incorrect results. This paper sketches out an interface-oriented estimating approach. This approach will lead to a procedure in which the building elements to be costed are structured in a way that corresponds to their functional logic. As result a linked-up procedure, such as is necessary to cope with complex systems, will be achieved and a complete costing made easier.

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Full text: content.pdf (281,326 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2005 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


Tuncer B, Stouffs R

Modeling building project information

Abstract: "Building projects are represented through a variety of documents such as drawings, diagrams, models, pictures, and textual information. These documents serve as a medium for communication between the different partners and disciplines within the AEC community. From a collaborative perspective, each document reflects on the author’s discipline as well as on the intended meaning. From a representation perspective, these documents present different aspects of the project such as the geometry, structure, context, and functional organization. As such, we can denote each of these documents an abstraction of the project. Without imposing an integrated product model, a ‘document-based’ approach is preferable for the organization and management of these documents. Here the documents are treated as individual entities, organized and related according to different categories and attributes. A drawback of this approach is that it is not possible to distinguish and relate components within these documents. To overcome this drawback, we propose the adoption of a modeling language, e.g., XML, as a common syntax to re-represent these abstractions. In this way, the documents can be interpreted and broken up into their components. These components within and between abstractions can then be related, and these relationships added to the representation. The result is an integrated model of components and relationships, represented in a uniform way. This paper focuses on some of the representational issues involved in the process of interpreting, breaking up and relating abstractions. We illustrate the potentials of this framework with the representation of a number of abstractions belonging to a body of built architecture, specifically, Ottoman mosques. The paper includes a discussion of the following issues or questions: - How are the components represented and the relationships between them created? The components are defined as structures of tags and attribute-value pairs, and constructed in a hierarchical manner. This enables a simple matching of components between various abstractions. For the creation of relationships, we therefore suggest a semi-automated approach where some of the relationships between components are automatically deduced from the structures and their composition in the representation. - What is the advantage of this representation? This representation does not impose any semantics, but only a common syntax for the definition and creation of an integrated model. This syntax allows one to link abstractions by defining the relationships as individual elements within the representation. Navigating the resulting model, not just the original abstractions but across abstractions through the respective links, yields new views of the project information."

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Full text: content.pdf (438,827 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.038235) class.store (0.036933) class.represent (0.025444)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


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