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Caneparo L

Computer-integrated construction of timber structure

Abstract: The paper presents the integrated information system supporting design, manufactory and construction of a large glued laminated timber structure in Aosta, Italy. Design, the structure was completely computer modelled with in-house developed software, which considered both torsion and curvature constraints of timber. Manufactory, further proprietary software was used to develop, on a plane, the shape of each timber layer without torsion and curvature. The profiles were converted into CNC instructions to cut the timber leaves. Construction, to manage and verify the process onsite RF Ethernet LAN was established to allow bi-directional online communication between total station, radio frequency identification and the information system.

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Full text: content.pdf (610,631 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.analysis (0.028666) class.communication (0.011615) class.social (0.007978)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Grazina J,Cachadinha N

Towards a systematic production progress assessment based on AR on BIM – prerequisites and functional requirements

Abstract: Many studies on augmented reality (AR) have showed that its usage in Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) sector is beneficial. Nowadays AR technology is growing rapidly, and the AEC sector can only benefit from it. Implementing AR upon Building Information Models (BIM) opens perspectives for new techniques and systems to manage onsite production. Measuring activities progress on a worksite is a time consuming process, and sometimes subject to inaccuracy. This may cause delays and cost overrun. Inaccuracy is mainly due to the lack of a standardized method to measure progress, which is usually done by each stakeholder according to his own customary method. Aiming at expediting and improving the reliability of the onsite production progress measurement, this study presents a conceptual model to measure activities progress and perform schedule updating using AR applied to BIM. For this purpose, the systems structure and design methodology (SSADM) was used to gather all the basic operations from similar systems, identify and eliminate the existing gaps, and add new operations. The concept proposed is based on a 5D (3D + schedule + cost) BIM model, which includes the activities planning, linked to the line items from the bill of quantities (BOQ). By superimposing the 5D model with reality onsite, it is possible to measure the activities progress and the cost up-to-date, through a physical comparison of as-built with as-planned. Deviations from the as-planned (both positive and negative) are detected by the system, which then automatically adjusts the planning according to the real worksite situation. This system reduces measurement errors and keeps the activities plan and costs updated. Measuring all kind of operations using AR onsite is seen as future perspectives.

Keywords: Building Information Modelling,Augmented Reality,Progress Measurement,Planning Production

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Series: convr:2013 (browse)
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Mohamad Kassem and Jennifer Li

Big Data Applications in Built Environment: Towards a Use Foundation Model

Abstract: The term Ōbig dataÕ is increasingly permeating the current debate over the present and the future of our built environment. There are heightened expectations about the role big data may or can play in enabling new applications and decisions across the whole lifecycle of assets, from early design phase through construction to operation and end-of-life. It is therefore necessary to analyse the state-of-the-art in big data applications in built environment. This paper presents a structured and systematic literature review on this emerging theme. The results are quantitatively analysed using network and clustering techniques. The research identified distinct clusters within two lenses: (1) the project lifecycle (i.e., design/planning, construction, and operation), and (2) the built environment hierarchy scale (i.e., component/product, building/facility, site, neighbourhood, region and city). Six clusters of big data applications across the two lenses were identified: energy management, traffic management, design & planning, onsite construction activities, city-wide services, and smart cities.The clusters show the level of research intensity around each of their nodes and the connections between the nodes which indicate the emergence of new avenues of investigations. These results represent the first steps towards developing a descriptive ŌUse Foundation model' for big data applications in built environment.

Keywords: Built Environment, Big Data, Internet of Things, Smart Data

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0220

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Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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Patrick C. Suermann & Raja R.A. Issa

CASE STUDIES: EVALUATING BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING IMPACT ON UNITED STATES ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS CONSTRUCTION

Abstract: Highlighted as test bed Districts for BIM implementation in the “U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Building Information Modeling (BIM) Road Map,” Seattle and Louisville accomplished in-house BIM designs in 2005, three years before any other of the 43 Districts across the United States transitioned to a BIM-centered approach in 2008. However, while perceived benefits of BIM used on these test bed jobs are driving Corps-wide changes on billions of dollars of construction, these BIM-based projects were never critically evaluated for their benefits in the construction phase, creating a need for further investigation. Therefore, this research addressed the need and assessed BIM impact on construction projects according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) internal metrics, the Consolidated Command Guidance (CCGs) metrics for military construction. Information garnered in the survey phase prior to onsite research at the Districts was used to guide research methodology assessing BIM effects on construction projects in the USACE Seattle and Louisville Districts. This research documented both quantitative and qualitative evidence demonstrated in BIM-based projects in Seattle and Louisville compared to similar projects (by facility use category code) to determine a correlation between BIM-based design and construction.

Keywords: Building Information Modeling (BIM), Key Performance Indicator (KPI), United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), construction, metrics

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Series: w78:2008 (browse)
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W Hengwei, Z Jianping, H Zhenzhong, W Hongdong

BIM-based Onsite Location-dynamic Information Integration and Management

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Series: w78:2015 (browse)
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Wirt D, Crouch G, Showalter W E

Integrating permanent equipment tracking with electronic operations and maintenance manuals

Abstract: Permanent equipment may be delivered months in advance of installation on a construction project. It may be received, stored off-site, transported to onsite storage, installed, and tested. During construction, there are obvious advantages to knowing where each piece of equipment is at any given time. During operation, the owner of the project needs to know the status of equipment during operation and be able to find the proper operating and maintenance information when required. We have completed a trial system on a wastewater treatment plant project that uses bar codes to track equipment from receipt to installation, and then is used to interface with an electronic operation and maintenance (O and M) manual. The O and M manual can be accessed in a variety of ways, including bar codes on the equipment, selecting the equipment on electronic drawings, and pointing and clicking on digitized photographs. The interface to the electronic O and M manual can be a valuable added service to the owner

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Full text: content.pdf (58,756 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.020918) class.synthesis (0.010491)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Xiaoning Ren, Zhenhua Zhu and Zhi Chen

Automatic Monitoring of Operating Equipment Efficiency for Air Pollutant Emission Estimation

Abstract: Construction activities are considered as one of the major air pollutant emissions sources. Specifically, construction equipment produces a large share of the emissions, including carbon oxides, nitrogen oxides, etc. on construction sites. Therefore, it is necessary to monitor and control the operating efficiency of the onsite equipment in order to reduce the amount of its air pollutant emissions. However, the current practices for monitoring and measuring the operating equipment efficiency is heavily dependent on the practitionersÕ observations. It is labour-intensive and time-consuming. The main objective of this paper is to present a novel method for automatically monitoring the operating equipment efficiency (OEE) with the fusion of visual and thermal data. Under the method, construction equipment is firstly located and tracked in the visual and thermal data. Based on the locating and tracking results, the equipment value-added activities are identified to determine its valuable operating time. Moreover, the total operating time is determined by checking the duration of the equipment with the running engine. This way, the OEE can be measured as the ratio of the valuable operating time over the total operating time. The method has been tested on the construction site of Poste De Lorimier in Montreal. The test results indicate its effectiveness.

Keywords: Operating Equipment Efficiency; Automation; Video Analysis; Thermal Data; Air Pollutant Emissions

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0207

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Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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Z Liu, M Osmani, P Demian, A N Baldwin

The potential use of BIM to aid construction waste minimisation

Abstract: It is widely acknowledged that the construction industry has a major impact on the environment, both in terms of resource consumption and waste production. The construction industry is responsible for producing a whole variety of different onsite wastes; the amount and type of which depends on factors such as the stage of construction, type of construction work, direct or indirect stakeholders’ design change contribution, and practices throughout the project lifecycle. A number of construction waste minimisation (CWM) techniques and tools are currently available to assist contractors to divert waste away from landfill. However, literature reveals that there are insufficient techniques and tools for reducing construction waste during the design and procurement stages. The last few years saw the emergence of Building Information Modelling (BIM) techniques, which can be adopted to improve sustainable construction performance. BIM is a maturing modelling philosophy, which has been applied to several building-related functions such as visualising designs, automating quantity takeoffs, checking compliance with regulations, and scheduling construction processes. Furthermore, BIM, as a real-time interactive and collaborative communication system, has the potential to help project stakeholders to collaboratively attain waste minimisation for sustainable construction and building throughout design, construction and throughout the lifecycle by improving building construction performance. Hence, this paper, which is part of an ongoing doctoral study, explores the potential application of BIM to design out waste. An in-depth literature review was conducted to provide a foundation for the doctoral study that aims to investigate the use of BIM as a potential platform for building design waste minimisation. The paper explores construction waste origins and causes, current waste reduction practices; examines current industry BIM practices and investigates BIM tools for sustainable project construction and management; and identifies the knowledge gaps in existing literature that pave the way for the subsequent data collection stages.

Keywords: Environmental impact, Sustainable construction, Construction waste minimisation (CWM), Building Information Modelling (BIM), Designing out waste

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Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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